APDU Conference: “Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue”

I am confident that all of you have heard this phrase in association with wedding ceremonies and how the brides prepare for the big event. Well, do you know why this is also an appropriate description for our big event, the APDU Annual Conference, to be held July 17-18, 2018?

A recurring theme throughout the agenda for this summer’s conference is the use of shared data from administrative records and surveys that are integrated in ways to create new and more informative data products for decision making. There are eight sessions focused on this issue and how the linking of administrative records and surveys is being prescribed and executed by federal, state, local and private organizations.

So how does the integration of administrative records and surveys by producers of public data relate to bridal preparations? First, this is not that new a process. Demographers have long combined data from birth and death certificates with census data to estimate fertility, mortality and migration rates. So that is the “Old” element which stands for continuity with the past. The “New” is meant to stand for optimism for the future. The “New” technical developments in record matching are greatly increasing the ability to link individual records from independent sources. However with this increased power have come concerns about privacy issues and maintaining public trust. “Something borrowed” because sharing increases the value of each of the items that are being shared. This requires overcoming legal barriers and institutional boundaries to reap the harvest of shared data. Finally, “something blue” stands for purity in the marriage ceremony. For the production of public data to assist policy making, it means that the integration of administrative records and survey data promise to compensate for the statistical weaknesses of each. The promise of more accurate data that are more representative, reliable and detailed.

I encourage you to accept our invitation to APDU’s Annual Conference, “Shaping The Future: The Promise Of Public Data To Inform Decisions.” Be a part of these exciting developments. Perhaps even bring along a bit of rice or bird seed to toss into the air as we celebrate these developments for public data.

Intermediate Application of Data Sets: Annual Business Survey (ABS)

The ABS is a new survey planned for survey years 2017-2021. The ABS will replace the Survey of Business Owners for employer businesses, the Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs, the Business R&D and Innovation Survey for Microbusinesses, as well as the Innovation component of the Business R&D and Innovation Survey.

The ABS is a joint project between the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. The purpose of the ABS is to reduce respondent burden, increase data quality, reduce operational costs and increase efficiency. The survey will produce annual minority-owned business estimates as well as annual R&D estimates on small employer businesses. Further, the survey will measure new business topics such as innovation and technology as well as other business and business owners characteristics. This webinar will give a background on the ABS, the survey components it has absorbed, and briefly discuss methodology and planned data product tabulation levels.

Presenter:
Naomi Blackman, Supervisory Survey Statistician, US Census Bureau

APDU Data Viz Awards: Call for Visualizations

The Association of Public Data Users (APDU) is pleased to announce the 2018 Data Viz Awards. We are once again soliciting creative and meaningful graphic designs that use publicly-available data (for example, data from the Census Bureau or Bureau of Labor Statistics) to convey a compelling point or story.

About the Award

APDU started the Data Viz Awards in response to our members’ growing need to communicate their data and research to a variety of audiences using graphic technologies and cutting-edge techniques. APDU hopes to engage data users and help them understand and share data for analysis and decision making.

The Data Viz Awards take pride in recognizing eye-catching and easy-to-comprehend images building on publicly-available data. Click here to view the award-winning visualizations from the 2017 APDU Data Viz Awards.

Winners will be invited to present at the 2018 APDU Annual Conference on July 17, 2018 in Arlington, VA. Winners in the “Researchers & Students” category will also receive a free APDU membership for 2018.

What We’re Looking For

APDU will select creative and compelling images, in four categories:

State/Local Government, including independent and quasi-independent agencies;

Federal Government, including independent and quasi-independent agencies;

Private firms, which can include consultancies, advocacy groups, or any other private firms using public data; and

Researchers & Students, which can include any visuals published or formally presented by researchers or students in higher education, think tanks, research organizations, nonprofits, or similar.

Submissions must have been made publicly available between June 2017 and May 2018. We are accepting submissions that appeared in a published research paper or article either in print or on the web, in a public presentation, as a stand-alone infographic, as a website feature, and/or as another official product.

Deadline: Friday, May 25, 2018

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Intermediate Application of Data Sets: Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW): Introduction and Update

The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program from the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes extremely detailed data at the county and industry level. The scale of the data presented by QCEW creates accessibility challenges for data users. Users who can surmount those challenges have access to a rich store of local data.

This webinar will serve as an introduction to the QCEW resource. It also provides tips on how to bring QCEW data to bear on research projects. Finally, it provides an update on QCEW calendar changes and new products.

Presenter:
David Hiles, Supervisory Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics

State Data Sharing Initiative Reports Released!

We invite you to learn more about how to improve your economic and workforce development outcomes by using evidence to drive decision making.  The Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness (CREC) just released the report, “Advancing State Data Sharing for Better Economic and Workforce Development” and the tool “Legal Guide to Administrative Data Sharing for Economic and Workforce Development” that offer important lessons for states interested in enabling the responsible use of administrative records for program research and analysis.

Access to administrative records – wage records and corporate tax filings – can be invaluable for making evidence-based policy decisions.  Yet accessing those records can be difficult.  During the past 18 months CREC has been working with five states to determine solutions to data sharing challenges as part of its State Data Sharing Initiative.  The lessons learned are:

  1. States can “get to yes” by addressing cultural barriers to data sharing
  2. Clearly articulate the laws governing data sharing
  3. States need to dedicate resources to data sharing efforts
  4. Data sharing advocates must manage up and down to gain and sustain support
  5. Standardizing data sharing processes creates meaningful progress

The Legal Guide covers common issues when negotiating an agreement to securely share data and sets out guidance that facilitate the responsible use of administrative data for evidence-based policy making to the full extent of federal and state laws.

CREC has worked on the State Data Sharing Initiative over the past two years to inform more rigorous analysis of economic and workforce development programs by better understanding the barriers to accessing administrative records responsibly.  The project included research on the legislation guiding data sharing in all 50 states, assessments of improvements to evaluation efforts that fully respect taxpayer privacy, and technical assistance to five states that agreed to take significant action on their data sharing policies over an 18-month engagement.  All the research can be found on the website: www.statedatasharing.org.

In addition to these two papers, the State Data Sharing Initiative website also includes a variety of resources including:

  • A summary of key legislative language in all 50 states, plus companion federal legislation
  • A research report on the barriers to data sharing in the 50 states
  • A legal guide for preparing data sharing agreement based on frequently asked questions
  • A toolkit of case studies and examples of successes linked to data sharing
  • A list of relevant publications about a variety of data sharing and management issues
  • An executive highlights report summarizing lessons learned from the project

Check out this free resource, brought to you by CREC with funding support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

Special Topics & Emerging Issues in Public Data: Improving Data Discoverability & Interoperability with DDI Metadata

The Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) is an international standard for describing survey and other social science data. Documenting research data with DDI facilitates interpretation and understanding — both by humans and computers. Learn how DDI improves the ability of researchers and organizations to Document, Discover, and Interoperate in this APDU Webinar on March 7.

Presenters:
Barry Radler, Distinguished Researcher, University of Wisconsin
Institute on Aging Jon Johnson, Data Management and Metadata specialist working, UK Data
Jared Lyle, Archivist, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

Special Topics and Emerging Issues in Public Data: 2020 Census Mapping Tools

With the 2020 Census fact approaching, both the Census Bureau and outside stakeholders are working to ensure that the Census is fair and accurate. In turn, both groups are developing mapping tools to identify areas that are difficult to count.

The low response score (LRS) is a metric developed by the US Census Bureau to classify geographic areas according to their propensity to self-respond to surveys and Censuses. Nancy Bates of the Census Bureau will showcase a new publicly-available tool that greatly simplifies the use of the LRS using a web-based mapping platform. The platform known as the Response Outreach Area Mapper, or ROAM, allows users to select a geography of interest to display tract-based maps colored-coded according to LRS. In addition to quickly identifying hard-to-survey areas, the ROAM also informs users why a particular area may be hard-to-count.

The Center for Urban Research at the CUNY Graduate Center, working with the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and other census supporters, developed the “Census 2020 Hard to Count Map” at www.CensusHardtoCountMaps2020.us to provide community groups, the media, Census Full Count Committees, and others with an online tool to highlight the hardest to count tracts in the country. This presentation by Steven Romalewski will introduce this intuitive, easy-to-use tool and potential upcoming additions.

Presenters:
Nancy Bates, Senior Researcher for Survey Methodology, Research and Methodology Directorate, U.S. Census Bureau
Steven Romalewski, Director, Mapping Service at the Graduate Center / CUNY

APDU Conference: Call for Proposals

The 2018 APDU Annual Conference (to be held on July 17-18, 2018 in Arlington, VA) invites APDU members and friends to submit proposals for presentations and panels related to our theme, “Shaping the Future:  The Promise of Public Data to Inform Public & Private Sector Decisions”. The Conference will bring together data users and data producers for conversations and presentations across a wide variety of data and statistical topics, including but not limited to:

  • Statistical policy
  • Data collection, production, and delivery
  • Emerging data issues
  • New data sources and tools
  • Relevant data dissemination technologies

We invite proposals on any topic relating to public data, whether based on a particular project, data practice, or formal paper.  In keeping with the theme of the conference, our interest is in how changes in public data, research techniques, and other advances will impact the way decisions are made in both the public and private sectors.  For the 2018 Conference, we are interested in presentations focused on:

Navigating the Public Data Landscape

  • Identifying the Data You Need
  • Preserving Data Privacy and Security
  • Responsibly Sharing and Disseminating Data

Realizing the Potential of Public Data

  • Linking Datasets
  • Selecting Sound Methods for Analysis
  • Developing Effective Data Visualizations
  • Leveraging Administrative Data

Deploying Data to Inform Decisions

  • Using Public Data in the Private Sector
  • Using Public Data in the State, Local, and Nonprofit Sector
  • Informing Evidence-Based Policymaking

Submissions may be for a single presentation or a full panel (three presenters, plus a moderator). APDU may accept portions of a panel proposal to combine with other presenters. Submissions will be evaluated on the quality of work, relevance to APDU Conference attendees, uniqueness of topic and presenter, and thematic fit.

Please submit the proposal document available at this link to Brendan Buff at bbuff@crec.net. Please submit proposals by Wednesday, January 31, 2018. Proposers will be notified of our decision by February 28, 2018.

IMPORTANT DATES

Deadline:
January 31, 2018
Notification Date:
February 28, 2018
Registration Opens:
March 1, 2018
APDU Annual Conference:
July 17-18, 2018

 

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Changes to the ACS

The Census Bureau has announced its intention to revise the American Community Survey for 2019. Click here to view the file, with relevant changes highlighted.

You can view the Federal Register notice summarizing the changes here. Please consider submitting a comment if you have any concerns.

Building the Case for Public Statistics

Building the Case for Public Statistics:

Special APDU Workshop

July 18, 2018
2018 APDU Annual Conference
Residence Inn Pentagon City
Arlington, VA

This workshop is offered as a supplemental component of the 2018 APDU Annual Conference. Register for the conference and you will receive an invitation to RSVP for the workshop.

AGENDA

Uncertain budgets, waning legislative support, limited knowledge about the costs and benefits of statistics… It is more important than ever that you effectively communicate about public data to your stakeholders.

Elected and appointed leaders need to hear from respected data users like you about how public data are used and why they are so vital. How do you do so effectively? It’s not just about the content of your messages, it’s also about when you share your experience.

APDU is offering a groundbreaking new program to help you. “Building the Case for Public Statistics” will help develop your communication skills in ways that improve your messaging, identify appropriate audiences, and navigate the complicated legislative process to determine when your expertise can make the greatest impact on key decisions about public data.

APDU is pleased to reintroduce the “Building the Case for Public Statistics” workshop to develop your skills in educating policymakers on the importance of Federal data. This time, it comes with twist: it will be integrated into the 2018 APDU Annual Conference!

Registrants will have access to the full conference agenda and may attend the specialized breakout sessions designed explicitly to expand your understanding of how best to work with legislators and policymakers to ensure they understand the challenges facing your favored data agency and the broader federal statistical system.

Register today to take advantage of this rare opportunity to learn from national experts on how to educate elected officials on public data. We encourage attendees to commit to attend the full session. Conference registrants will be invited to RSVP for the session to secure their place.

Spots are limited, so register for the conference today!

 

Meet the Trainers

Mary Jo Hoeksema, Director of Government Affairs for the Population Association of America and Association of Population Centers, and Co-Director of The Census Project

Mary Jo Hoeksema advocates for funding federal agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, Census Bureau, and National Center for Health Statistics. Since 2008, she has also been Co-Director of The Census Project, a diverse collaborative of national, state, and local organizations, including APDU, which support the decennial census and American Community Survey.

Emily J. Holubowich, Senior Vice President, CRD Associates

Emily J. Holubowich has 15 years of experience in health and fiscal policy, government relations, strategic communications, and coalition management. Ms. Holubowich has an extensive body of written work and more recently has authored and managed the production of the reports for advocacy campaigns and is frequently sought out by the media for her expertise on public health and fiscal policy.

Dale Oak, President, Oak Federal Solutions, LLC

Dale Oak has more than 30 years of experience on federal budget and appropriations matters in government and the private sector. Decades of senior staff experience help Mr. Oak translate budget and appropriations developments, facts and figures into actionable information.

Conference Registration Fees* 
Non-Members Individual & Organizational Members Premium Organizational Members
Early Bird Registration
(On or before June 22)
$645 $475 $420
Full Price Registration
(After June 22)
$720 $525 $470